How Can Grounding and Earthing Help You Recover From Inflammation

What is Earthing?

Earthing is basically “grounding” yourself to a negative charge. Just like you would ground a wire to a negative charge so certain electronic appliances won’t shock you and put you in danger. The ground wire is typically known as the safety wire.

Because we are constantly indoors, surrounded by electrical appliances, we too have a positive charge that can be grounded. You can ground yourself by stepping outside barefoot in the grass or beach. The wetter the grass, dirt, or beach area, the better the grounding works. When you do this you are neutralizing the positive charge your body has. This is real and can be measured by using a multi-meter.

The Greasing the Groove Method to Getting Fit

“Greasing the Groove” was a term that was coined by fitness trainer, author, and the man who introduced kettlebells to the United States, Pavel Tsatsouline. It’s a term that means not working your muscles to failure, but working them often. For example,  instead of 5 sets of 12 repetitions of a specific muscle group where you go to failure, just do 5  reps or less. Take a long break in between sets. Sometimes up to 20 minutes or more.  You can do the same for other muscle groups during this time of rest. This way, you’re not beating yourself up while still getting a high volume of heavy reps. 

How To Preserve Muscle Mass As You Age

Lean body mass does not increase with age. On average, when you reach the age of 30, you start to lose muscle mass. This is known as sarcopenia. This happens to those who have a sedentary lifestyle as well as those who are inactive. There are multiple causes for sarcopenia to occur. This includes changes

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Your VO2 Max

What is Your VO2 Max? VO2 max is the maximum oxygen your muscles consume during peak activity. V for volume and O2 for oxygen. What is the average VO2 Max? This depends primarily on the age and gender of the person. Some averages: Average sedentary male – 35 to 40 mL/kg/min Average sedentary female –